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Maps

There are a growing number of excellent and useful maps surrounding electric vehicle (EV) and EV supply equipment (EVSE) efforts. The below tabs provide you access to the maps or mapping tools.

Map of Tennessee’s Corridor DCFC Gaps – 2021

This embedded map is the one TDEC and TVA used in summer/fall 2021 to show gaps in corridors in Tennessee for the round of funding they managed called the “Fast Charge TN Network.” You can read more about their release of funds and the process here. The map shows all of the “major” corridor routes (interstates mostly) as well as many secondary corridors that are major trafficways around the state.

If you would like to see the map full screen, click here to open it in a new tab. Not recommended for viewing on a phone.

The map is a really great example of online mapping as there are several tools you can use built in including a legend and layers, both of which can be ‘opened’ or removed for better viewing. You MUST EXPLORE the Layers tool! This is where you can a) turn off and on certain corridors to see how they impact the larger picture, b) understand how they differentiated DCFC stations, and c) click the “TVA LPCs” option and instead of seeing counties see stations based on the footprint of Tennessee’s “LPCs” – the local power companies that provide and maintain your local electricity supply.

SE REVI Planning Map

States and territories participating in SE REVI (Southeast Regional Electric Vehicle Information Exchange) have launched a multi-state EV infrastructure map to enable coordination across the region on EV infrastructure investments. The interactive map utilizes various data, including locations of current and planned Level 2 and DC fast chargers, state and national parks, Federal Highway Administration-designated Alternative Fuel Corridors, hurricane evacuation routes, social equity data, and electric service provider territories. Developed with input from each SE REVI participant, the map can be used to inform EV infrastructure investment decisions and to conduct education and outreach on EV infrastructure gaps and opportunities along priority corridors.

If you would like to see the map full screen, click here to open it in a new tab. Not recommended for viewing on a phone.

Map of Tennessee’s Corridor DCFC Gaps – 2021

(If you would like to see the map full screen, click here to open it in a new tab. Not recommended for viewing on a phone.)
The Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Justice40 Map is a tool to help EV charging planning efforts align with the Justice40 goal of 40% of the benefits of Federal investments in clean transportation going to disadvantaged communities (DACs).
 
The map can display multiple data layers identifying DACs, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) designated EV corridors, public DC fast charge stations (non-Tesla), and electrical substations.
 
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) created a joint interim guidance DOE and DOT DAC map for the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) program which can be used in conjunction with data layers showing tribal land and U.S. territories.
 
This DAC methodology is consistent with the Justice40 Interim Guidance and uses existing, publicly available data sets that capture: vulnerable populations (socioeconomic, housing burden, etc.), health, transportation access and burden, energy burden, fossil dependence, resilience, and environmental and climate hazards. 
 
FHWA designates two EV corridor categories:
  1. EV Corridor Ready – A sufficient number of EV charging stations currently exist (minimum 50-mile intervals)
  2. EV Corridor Pending – An insufficient number of EV charging stations currently exist

Map of Tennessee’s Corridor DCFC Gaps – 2021

For many years there have been LPCs – Local Power Companies – that serve as your local power provider and system manager. LPCs are mostly one of two types in Tennessee:  Municipal-based (muni), or of the Cooperative model (coop). TVA produces the power and handles the large distribution network to them, while they handle power more at the local level. You pay your bill to your LPC.
The following map shows the LPCs that are in Tennessee!
DET is working to further our relationships with LPCs from MLGW (Memphis Light Gas and Water) to Tri-County EMC (north central TN) to BrightRidge (Washington County in the Tri-Cities area). Your LPC is learning more about EVs and EVSE, engaging locally on EV education, and even installing Level 2 and DCFC equipment!
Map of LPCS in TN